Monday, November 21, 2011

David Gauld: A Fringe Glasgow Boy

I know little about David Gauld (1865-1936) who Roger Billcliffe includes in his Glasgow Boys book, but admittedly as having a "distant relationship with the Boys."

It seems he worked in stained glass as well as painting, and a couple of 1888 paintings are done in an outlines-with-flatly-painted-interiors style that, for a reason I can't explain, has always intrigued me. Another reason for presenting him here is that my wife recently booked us on a tour of Ireland and Scotland for next summer, so I need to prime myself for some gallery gawking in those places. (I've been to Ireland and Scotland, but that was before I got involved with blogging about art. So while having paid some attention then, I plan to be more knowledgeable this time; be braced for more posts about Scottish and Irish painters.)

Here are a few examples of Gauld's work.


Music - 1888
St. Agnes - 1888
These paintings are done in the cloisonné style mentioned above.

The Procession of St. Agnes
St. Agnes-related again, but in a more conventional style.

Portrait of Irene Vanburgh
A nicely done portrait of the actress.

At this point, I have have nothing special to say about Gauld's paintings. But I'll keep my eyes peeled once I'm in Glasgow and Edinburgh so that I might confront one in person.


dearieme said...

Take your cheque book and credit card. About 35 years ago we were in an Edinburgh gallery and fell for a Raeburn portrait of Jeffrey (the Edinburgh Review chap)- we decided we could afford it if we sold our car. But we funked it. Don't make such a mistake yourself.

Donald Pittenger said...

dearieme -- Sorry for not replying sooner, but we've been on the road; arrived in Las Vegas yesterday evening following a three-day drive.

I hope I don't bump into an available Raeburn, because I'd be as tempted as you -- and probably even less able to afford it.